Looking forward to the Java 9 Track at EclipseCon

Tue, 2016-01-12 11:04

It was a great pleasure to have a chance to serve on this year’s EclipseCon Program Committee. As Java SE 8 adoption took place at “record-setting pace” during the past year, I was glad to see the EclipseCon team set their sights ahead, towards JDK 9, with its own track at EclipseCon. If you’d just like to take a peek at the changes being considered, developed and integrated into the JDK 9 Project, you can check out its web site in the OpenJDK community, and try out the Early Access builds.

If you’d like to hear what JDK 9 means for Eclipse, though, then you should come to EclipseCon in March and hear about it first hand from Jay Arthanareeswaran from IBM and Manoj Palat, who will talk about Java 9 support in Eclipse. In their session, they will look at what kind of support JDT provides for developers who would like to use JDK 9 in their projects, discussing planned Eclipse features as well as what modules could mean to different projects and how to best leverage the upcoming module system.

Within the OpenJDK community, Project Jigsaw is where development of the reference implementation of JSR 376 – Java Platform Module System takes place, along with the modularization of the JDK itself and the development of a new run-time image format. That’s a lot of new stuff to digest – fortunately, we’ll have Thomas Schindl at EclipseCon to give us a personal view and overview of what he calls "most likely the biggest change in Java’s history" in the “You, Me and Jigsaw” session.

At this point, you may be wondering if JDK 9 is all about modules. Modularity plays a huge role, but there is a lot more to it – more than 70 JDK Enhancement Proposals have been targeted for the JDK 9 release so far. To walk us through some of Java 9’s other puzzle pieces, we’ll have Erik Costlow from Oracle.

Finally, closing this track on Thursday, Erik will discuss “Preparing your code for JDK 9”. There are some steps you can take already to make your code ready to benefit from the new features planned for JDK 9, such as analyzing your project’s library dependencies for unintentional reliance on JDK-internal APIs.

I hope that you will enjoy this EclipseCon track, and that you will be inspired to start experimenting with JDK 9 and Eclipse.