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Branches, branches, everywhere, no time left to code

Konstantin Komissarchik (Oracle )

Making For Eclipse · Sponsored
Wednesday, 14:00, 25 minutes | Camino Real

Tags: Build and Continuous Integration
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Branches are a necessary tool that enable developers to work on multiple releases in parallel, but they carry a high cost. Changes need to be manually propagated, adding a significant "tax" to every change. It can also be hard to tell what changes exist in what branch, whether any changes were lost (not propagated) and whether it is safe to propagate a change.

Shipping plugins for Eclipse presents requirements that compound this problem further. Not only do you have to branch for your product's releases, but you may also need to branch to track your product against multiple versions of Eclipse.

This talk will discuss a solution developed at Oracle that uses waterfall branch structure and automated processes to effectively illiminate most of the overhead associated with branching while also lowering the associated risks.

Konstantin is an engineering team lead at Oracle working on a product with close ties to Eclipse and has been a committer on the Web Tools Platform since before its first release. He has designed and implemented the Faceted Project Framework which made it possible for people to easily extend capabilities of WTP projects. Lately, he has been focusing on Sapphire, a project  that strives to make modeling more approachable for regular Java developers and make it easier to build full solutions, from data to model to a slick declared UI. In his prior life, he has worked on compilers, custom servers and network protocol design. He graduated from the University of Washington with BS in Computer Science.

Slides