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Composite Bundles - Isolating Applications in a Collaborative OSGi World

Thomas Watson (IBM )

Making For Eclipse · Extended (50 mins)
Wednesday, 14:30, 50 minutes | Winchester

Tags: OSGi DevCon , Runtime
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The OSGi specification (R4.2) introduced a provisional specification called composite bundles.  In this talk the lead developers of two prominent open source OSGi framework implementations will join forces to discuss lessons learned with the provisional composite bundle specification and what improvements are expected for the next release of the core framework specification for composite bundles.  Richard Hall is the chair of the Apache Felix project and Tom Watson is the co-lead of the Eclipse Equinox project. Together they will explain the issues with the R4.2 provisional composite specification and discuss the changes being done in order to graduate the composite bundle specification for the next OSGi core specification release.

The OSGi framework provides a powerful runtime for the Java platform, which promotes strong modularity, versioning and dynamic management of applications. Bundles (or modules) installed in the framework are expected to collaborate and live together sharing the same service registry and public class space. Until now there was no standard way to provide additional isolation to a group of bundles installed in a single framework.  In this talk we will discuss how composite bundles can be used to provide additional isolation to a group of bundles or applications installed into the framework.

Composite bundles are managed in a similar way as other bundles installed into an OSGi framework. The key difference is the content of a composite bundle is composed by a set of bundles called constituents.  Conceptually a composite bundle provides a virtual framework, called a composite framework, where constituent bundles are installed and running.  The composite bundle can be used to manage the composite framework. Composite bundles support a two-way relationship between the parent framework and composite framework instances, where packages and services can be shared from the parent to the composite framework and vice versa.

During this talk we will go into the gory details of the composite bundle specification and demonstrate composite bundles running on an OSGi framework implementation.
 

Thomas co-leads the Equinox Project at Eclipse and is a member of the Eclipse Runtime PMC. Thomas has 10 years of experience as an IBM software architect and developer, and is currently working for IBM Lotus. Thomas's focus is on modularity and the OSGi Framework design and development. He is the lead developer for the Equinox OSGi Framework implementation in Eclipse.

Thomas has been involved in the development of OSGi technologies since 2002 and played a key role in the adoption of OSGi technologies by the Eclipse platform.  He is currently a member of the OSGi Core Platform Expert Group (CPEG) and made significant contributions to the OSGi Release 4 specifications.

Slides