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Broken Bricks in the Wall: Functional Testing and Supporting Eclipse Products, Part II

Dmitriy Kovalev (Xored Software Inc ), Andrey Platov (Xored Software Inc ), Alex Panchenko

Making With Eclipse · Sponsored
Thursday, 15:20, 55 minutes | Alameda

Tags: Business And Industry , Test And Performance , UI / RCP
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Part II: Automating Support of Eclipse-Based Products

Supporting Eclipse ecosystem in the enterprise is a challenging task. There is a great software that simplifies deployment of different products in various configurations, but support of that products becomes a nightmare. Typical eclipse installation may consist of tens of products from "official" eclipse products, proprietary/third-party tools, and in-house plugins. So any unexpected behavior can confuse end-user, and even identification of malfunctioning product can be a problem. 

The picture becomes more complicated when different parts of deployed solution are developed and maintained by different teams in the enterprise. Support teams often got overwhelmed with misreported problems (not_our_bug:), re-routing them to each other, as well as receiving hundreds of duplicate reports from huge user base. So support of large user base of heterogeneous eclipse installations takes a lot of effort and resources. 

We believe that a significant part of support process can be automated, thus reducing the burden of communication between end-users and developers and even warning users before the problem is actually noticed on their side.

During this session we will discuss support automation approaches and show some working solutions in this area, which could be interesting both to engineers supporting Eclipse in enterprises and to small eclipse-based software vendors that have relatively big user base.