10 Things You Never Knew You Could do with JavaDoc

Michael Wallick

Eclipse IDE And Languages - Java · Short - 10 minutes  slideshare zip files
Wednesday, 10:20, 10 minutes | Room 209/210

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Method Detail

javaDocTalk

TalkAbstract.Information javaDocTalk(TalkAbstract.Speaker speaker,
                                     java.util.ArrayList<TalkAbstract.Attendee> audience)

The Eclipse Javadoc viewer includes a powerful HTML renderer and viewer. This allows traditional Javadoc comments to include simple decorations such as Bold and Italics. However with a little bit of creativity and work, more advanced javadoc comments are possible. For example, external images can be embedded to illustrate how methods work.

A developer may consider linking to Bugzilla to help users track and report issues found with an under-development project, or give an e-mail address for the same purpose.

In this talk I will show approximately 10 different ways to create interactive, dynamic and generally interesting Javadoc comments; discuss the limitations of the HTML browser; and invite the Eclipse Community to come up with more new ways to maximize Javadoc usage.

Parameters:
speaker - TalkAbstract.SpeakerThe person who is going to deliver this talk
audience - TalkAbstract.Attendee those attending this talk hoping to learn new ways of using JavaDoc.
Returns:
A new way of looking at and creating Javadoc comments

Extra Information
The entire Javadoc of this abstract (with working links). You can download an Eclipse Ready version of this abstract. Or see screen shots fo the Javadoc browser.

Michael received his BS in Computer Science (with Honors) from the University of Central Florida in 2001. He was awarded a Masters and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2003 and 2007 respectively, where he worked on software for automatic video editing and automatic organization of large collections of digital photographs. In 2004 he was named as a Microsoft Research Graduate Fellow. He joined the Operations Planning Software Group (and Ensemble Project) at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 2007, where he is leading the development of a mission data search interface for the Mars Science Laboratory rover, and future missions.

Michael currently lives in Montrose, CA with his wife Christine and their son Ethan.

This session is part of the curated collection of short talks titled
"Seeing the Forest for The Trees: Sifting Through Javadoc and Code"

Slides

Java Doc Talk
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